Put Tomorrow in A Bottle~Audrey

“I’m waiting for the day that, together we can find another way back, put everything we’ve got at stake, worry about today, and out tomorrow in a bottle. If there’s some way that we can tack back the wrong we created, we can change that, don’t turn your head the other way, you’re born to save todays. Let’s put tomorrow in the bottle.”

“Tomorrow in the Bottle”

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Kidney advocates around the world are celebrating today. It’s World Kidney Day; a day where kidney patients and health care professionals educate the public about the health of their kidneys. The spectrum is varied when it comes to kidney disease. Some conditions cause diabetes or crippling lameness. Some versions are easy managed by drugs while other must spend the majority of their time on dialysis. Everyone’s experience with the disease is different manner but the disease is just as real for everyone.

Last month, I went for my annual kidney checkup. By the grace of God, a wonderful doctor, and the marvels of modern medicine, I am stable. My chronic nephritis is under control with just the use of a high blood pressure medication that keeps my kidney filters from becoming inflamed. I have also done some life style changes. I drink more water, wear special socks for my circulation, and am eating better.

I am blessed not to have to deal with dialysis for another 20 years. This is both a blessing and a curse. The good side, everyone tells me,  is that medical technology is coming a long way, so I may have it never have to dialysis. But it also a curse because I know it is going to happen. I have to live with the fact that I only have so many good years before my condition will change my way of life, and I find that scary.

God and I talk a lot about this a lot. I have never, ever asked Him why this happened to me. I have accepted my fate, but pray and ask that he eases my fear. As I write this, I am saying a silent prayer for him to relieve my anxiety about the future. He lays a healing hand on me and makes me feel better. I am doing better about the amount of anxiety that I let build up.

I write this not for sympathy but for awareness. Because if a healthy, young, and vibrant young women can have a debilitating disease, anyone can. You never know about someone for looking at them. God has given us all challenges and we all have our separate journey. I pray for you and your unique issues.

So today, share the following kidney facts, and I’ll put tomorrow in a bottle.

Kidney Facts
The most common causes of kidney disease are high blood pressure and diabetes.

544132_10151494608039106_1648321569_nKidney disease is very common. In 2010, 20 million people aged 20 and older in the U.S. had chronic kidney disease, more than 10% of adults.

According to the most recent data from the National Institutes of Health, more than 527,000 people in the U.S. were being treated for end-stage renal disease.

African Americans are four times more likely than whites to develop ESRD. Hispanics are also at higher risk for kidney disease.

People who have diabetes or hypertension are at a higher than average risk of developing CKD. Other factors that put someone at higher risk of CKD include high cholesterol, obesity, a family history of the disease, and cardiovascular disease.

In 2011, about 70,000 people will develop kidney cancer, and 13,120.

In early stages, kidney disease often has no symptoms, so many people are unaware they have it. Later on, symptoms may include frequent urination, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, swollen hands or feet, itchiness, dark skin, muscle cramps and trouble concentrating.

Chronic kidney disease often cannot be cured. Treatment usually focuses on trying to prevent the condition from getting worse, by keeping diabetes and high blood pressure under control.

Treatment may include immunosuppressive drugs or steroids.
If the kidneys stop working, treatment options are dialysis (cleansing the blood through artificial means), kidney transplant, or in some cases, palliative or hospice care.

There are two primary methods of dialysis. In hemodialysis, a patient’s blood flows through a machine that removes wastes, and then back into the body. The other form of dialysis is called peritoneal dialysis. A fluid is injected into the abdomen through a catheter; it collects wastes from the blood and is then drained out of the body.

The first successful kidney transplant was done in 1954. In 2010, 28,662 kidney transplants took place in the U.S. Of those, 21,853 kidneys were from deceased donors; the rest were from living donors.

Currently, nearly 90,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for a kidney transplant Kidney disease is very common. In 2010, 20 million people aged 20 and older in the U.S. had chronic kidney disease, more than 10% of adults.

According to the most recent data from the National Insitutes of Health, more than 527,000 people in the U.S. were being treated for end-stage renal disease.e462baca6bbb7dcbfaa1985ef88e97fe

African Americans are four times more likely than whites to develop ESRD. Hispanics are also at higher risk for kidney disease.

People who have diabetes or hypertension are at a higher than average risk of developing CKD. Other factors that put someone at higher risk of CKD include high cholesterol, obesity, a family history of the disease, and cardiovascular disease.

In 2011, about 70,000 people will develop kidney cancer, and 13,120 .

In early stages, kidney disease often has no symptoms, so many people are unaware they have it. Later on, symptoms may include frequent urination, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, swollen hands or feet, itchiness, dark skin, muscle cramps and trouble concentrating.

Chronic kidney disease often cannot be cured. Treatment usually focuses on trying to prevent the condition from getting worse, by keeping diabetes and high blood pressure under control.

Treatment may include immunosuppressive drugs or steroids.
If the kidneys stop working, treatment options are dialysis (cleansing the blood through artificial means), kidney transplant, or in some cases, palliative or hospice care.

There are two primary methods of dialysis. In hemodialysis, a patient’s blood flows through a machine that removes wastes, and then back into the body. The other form of dialysis is called peritoneal dialysis. A fluid is injected into the abdomen through a catheter; it collects wastes from the blood and is then drained out of the body.

The first successful kidney transplant was done in 1954. In 2010, 28,662 kidney transplants took place in the U.S. Of those, 21,853 kidneys were from deceased donors; the rest were from living donors.

Currently, nearly 90,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for a kidney transplant

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  1. #1 by Venus on March 17, 2013 - 4:24 am

    Very informative Audrey! You’re better than most people when it comes to not being mad at God for their health issues. Some people are just straight bitter about it but not you! I commend you for opening up and telling people about your experience w/ chronic kidney failure. I also commend you on raising awareness about it. You are radical girl! Love you! ~Venus

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